15 Most Popular Poems by Emily Dickinson

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  • Wild Nights - Wild Nights!

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    "Wild Nights - Wild Nights!" by Emily Dickinson is a passionate expression of desire and longing. In this short yet powerful poem, Dickinson uses the imagery of a wild, untamed night to symbolize intense emotions and romantic yearning. The repetition of the phrase "Wild nights" emphasizes the speaker's excitement and fervor. Dickinson employs vivid language and evocative imagery to convey the intensity of the speaker's longing for love and connection. Despite its brevity, the poem captures the overwhelming nature of romantic passion and the sense of exhilaration that comes with it. Through its lyrical beauty and emotional depth, "Wild Nights - Wild Nights!" remains a timeless exploration of the complexities of love and desire.

    Wild nights - Wild nights!
    Were I with thee
    Wild nights should be
    Our luxury!

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  • I Measure Every Grief I Meet

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    In this poem, the speaker compares her grief to the grief of those around her. She talks about the different types of grief and tries to make this emotion tangible. Emily Dickinson’s poems have consistent components, and this poem follows many of them: dashes, capitals in the middle of lines, and four-line stanzas.

    I measure every Grief I meet
    With narrow, probing, eyes –
    I wonder if It weighs like Mine –
    Or has an Easier size.

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    Penny, you are so right to be honest and tell it like it is for you because that's how I feel as well. It's ok not to be ok. My daughter died on May 23, 2019, of a drug overdose. She had...

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  • If I Can Stop One Heart From Breaking

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    in Famous Inspirational Poems

    This poem is by Emily Dickinson (1830-1886). Like all the rest of her poems, the poem does not have a title and is called by the first line of the poem. Dickinson had the gift of saying a tremendous amount in a few perfectly succinct words. The poem's message is simple and self-explanatory. If I can ease the burden of a fellow living creature, "I shall not live in vain."

    If I can stop one heart from breaking,
    I shall not live in vain;
    If I can ease one life the aching,
    Or cool one pain,

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    The poem transmits the meaning of helping from the heart, reaching out to those in need and soothing the pain felt by others. It doesn't need a hero to work wonders, only need a heart to...

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  • Hope Is The Thing With Feathers

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    Emily Dickinson, born in 1830 in Amherst, Massachusetts, is the author of almost 2,000 poems. Only after she died in 1886 were her poems discovered. In this metaphorical poem the bird is a symbol for hope. Hope Is The Thing With Feathers is written in quatrains and uses an ABCB rhyme scheme

    "Hope" is the thing with feathers -
    That perches in the soul -
    And sings the tune without the words -
    And never stops - at all -

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    I recited this poem in grade six and it has been an inspiration for me ever since. Wonderful work!

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  • Because I Could Not Stop For Death

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    A poem about death. Dickinson portrays death as her companion in the carriage. She passes her childhood - the school, to her grave. The poem makes heavy use of the literary device of personification, giving death human characteristics.

    Because I could not stop for Death,
    He kindly stopped for me;
    The carriage held but just ourselves
    And Immortality.

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    Featured Shared Story

    Yeah, I agree we don't stop to think that death will come and take us away even when the ones he has taken are staring right at us. My grandma passed away when I was little. I sobbed for hours.

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  • There Is Another Sky

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    in Famous Nature Poems

    This poem about finding a beautiful garden is one of Emily Dickinson's most well known poems. The precise meaning of the poem is a matter of opinion. One possibility is that she is pointing out that a person may be disappointed in his quest to experience beauty in the world. However, when we look inside ourselves and one another, we may find a flourishing beautiful garden of delights!

    There is another sky,
    Ever serene and fair,
    And there is another sunshine,
    Though it be darkness there;

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    My mother, Joyce, loves her garden, which she made and made beautiful; and her other garden is the seeds of positivity, love, and joy that she has sown throughout her life. Joyce is 84 now...

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  • The Mountain

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    "The Mountain" by Emily Dickinson depicts the majestic presence of a mountain on the plain. The mountain is a metaphor for a timeless grandfather figure, firmly seated in its eternal chair, and possessing a comprehensive awareness that extends everywhere. The poem further illustrates the mountain's significance by likening it to a revered figure, with the seasons gathering around it like children around a father. The mountain is depicted as a revered ancestor, the originator of each new day's dawn.

    The mountain sat upon the plain
    In his eternal chair,
    His observation omnifold,
    His inquest everywhere.

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  • Before The Ice Is In The Pools

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    in Famous Holiday Poems

    Emily Dickinson was an American poet who lived from 1830-1886. The first volume of her poetry was not published until four years after her death. In this poem, it’s not clear what the speaker was waiting for, but some believe it could be Sue, Emily’s sister-in-law. They spent many years corresponding with each other but had moments of estrangement. Some believe this poem also has religious and spiritual references to touching to cloak of Jesus and crossing over to death. Or it could simply be about waiting for winter to arrive. This poem is composed of quatrains (four-line stanzas) that follow the ABCB rhyme scheme.

    Before the ice is in the pools—
    Before the skaters go,
    Or any check at nightfall
    Is tarnished by the snow—

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  • A Light Exists In Spring

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    in Famous Nature Poems

    Emily Dickinson was a famous American poet who lived during the 1800s. In addition to writing, she also studied botany, which could have been an influence in her poems about nature. This poem is about the light that illuminates all that's around it during spring. While this poem is about nature, it has a strong religious undertone, showing there are things science is unable to fully explain.

    A Light exists in Spring
    Not present on the Year
    At any other period --
    When March is scarcely here

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    The poem depicts supremacy of nature. Nature is beyond natural laws. It's the underlying truth that nature poets communicate to us through their writings.

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  • Dear March - Come In -

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    Dear March - Come In - by Emily Dickinson is a welcoming ode to the arrival of the month of March. In this brief yet evocative poem, Dickinson personifies March as a cherished guest, inviting it to enter warmly. Through its simple language and gentle tone, the poem captures the anticipation and hope associated with the transition from winter to spring. Dickinson's imagery evokes the awakening of nature and the promise of new beginnings as March heralds the arrival of warmer weather and the renewal of life.

    Dear March—Come in—
    How glad I am—
    I hoped for you before—
    Put down your Hat—

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