Albert Camus

About Albert Camus

Albert Camus (7 November 1913 – 4 January 1960) was a French Nobel Prize winning author, journalist, and philosopher.
He was born on 7 November 1913 in Dréan (then known as Mondovi) in French Algeria
He was the second-youngest recipient, at the age of 44, of the Nobel Prize in Literature, after Rudyard Kipling, at the age of 42.
Camus died on January 4, 1960 at the age of 46. In his coat pocket was an unused train ticket. He had planned to travel by train with his wife and children, but at the last minute he accepted his publisher's proposal to travel with him.

His views contributed to the rise of the philosophy known as absurdism. He wrote in his essay The Rebel that his whole life was devoted to opposing the philosophy of nihilism while still delving deeply into individual freedom.
Camus did not consider himself to be an existentialist despite usually being classified as one, even in his lifetime. In a 1945 interview, Camus rejected any ideological associations: "No, I am not an existentialist. Sartre and I are always surprised to see our names linked...".
Camus was born in Algeria to a Pied-Noir family, and studied at the University of Algiers. In 1949, Camus founded the Group for International Liaisons to "denounce two ideologies found in both the USSR and the USA".

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