Famous Love Poems - Page 2

21 - 30 of 30 Poems

  1. 21. Advice To A Girl

    Famous Poem

    Sara Teasdale (1884-1933) was an American poet who wrote seven books of poetry during her lifetime. Many of her poems focused on the emotional development of women. In this poem, the opening lines are repeated at the end, bringing attention to the theme of this poem that no one is in control of who you are. Each person has value and cannot be possessed by another.

    No one worth possessing
    Can be quite possessed;
    Lay that on your heart,
    My young angry dear;
    This truth, this hard and precious stone,
    Lay it on your hot cheek,
    Let it hide your tear.
    Hold it like a crystal
    When you are alone
    And gaze in the depths of the icy stone.
    Long, look long and you will be blessed:
    No one worth possessing
    Can be quite possessed.

    Go To Complete Poem

    • Stories 0
    • Shares 833
    • Favorited 20
    • Votes 162
    • Rating 4.22
    • Poem of the Day
    Featured Shared Story

    No Stories yet, You can be the first!

    Touched by the poem? Share your story! (0)

  2. Advertisement

    Advertisement

  3. 22. A Red, Red Rose

    • By Robert Burns

    Famous Poem

    In "A Red, Red Rose" by Robert Burns, the poet employs several poetic techniques to express the depth of his love and commitment. Through vivid imagery, he compares his love to a "red, red rose" that blooms freshly in June, evoking the beauty and fragility of nature. The use of simile in the opening lines enhances the romantic tone of the poem, likening his love to a sweet melody played in perfect harmony. Additionally, Burns utilizes repetition for emphasis, with the phrase "I will love thee still, my dear" recurring throughout the poem, reinforcing the everlasting nature of his affection. Through these poetic techniques, Burns eloquently conveys the enduring passion and devotion he feels for his beloved, promising to love her unconditionally until the end of time.

    O my Luve is like a red, red rose
        That’s newly sprung in June;
    O my Luve is like the melody
        That’s sweetly played in tune.

    So fair art thou, my bonnie lass,
        So deep in luve am I;
    And I will luve thee still, my dear,
        Till a’ the seas gang dry.

    Till a’ the seas gang dry, my dear,
        And the rocks melt wi’ the sun;
    I will love thee still, my dear,
        While the sands o’ life shall run.

    And fare thee weel, my only luve!
        And fare thee weel awhile!
    And I will come again, my luve,
        Though it were ten thousand mile.

    Go To Complete Poem

    • Stories 0
    • Shares 126
    • Favorited 2
    • Votes 10
    • Rating 4.20
    Featured Shared Story

    No Stories yet, You can be the first!

    Touched by the poem? Share your story! (0)

  4. Advertisement

    Advertisement

  5. 23. I Do Not Love You Except Because I Love You

    Famous Poem

    Pablo Neruda was born in 1904 in Chile. His real name was Neftali Ricardo Reyes Basoalto. He wrote in green ink as a symbol of love and desire. Many of his poems have been translated from the original Spanish.

    I do not love you except because I love you;
    I go from loving to not loving you,
    From waiting to not waiting for you
    My heart moves from cold to fire.

    I love you only because it's you the one I love;
    I hate you deeply, and hating you
    Bend to you, and the measure of my changing love for you
    Is that I do not see you but love you blindly.

    Maybe January light will consume
    My heart with its cruel
    Ray, stealing my key to true calm.

    In this part of the story I am the one who
    Dies, the only one, and I will die of love because I love you,
    Because I love you, Love, in fire and blood.

    Go To Complete Poem

    • Stories 2
    • Shares 2761
    • Favorited 45
    • Votes 614
    • Rating 4.19
    • Poem of the Week
    Featured Shared Story

    Sounds like what every humble man goes through 'till he wins her heart or someone comes along and steals her away from him.

    Touched by the poem? Share your story! (2)

  6. 24. If Thou Must Love Me

    Famous Poem

    If Thou Must Love Me is Sonnet 14 in "Sonnets from the Portuguese," a collection of 44 love poems from Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806 – 1861) to her future husband Robert Browning. The couple married in 1846 and the collection was first published in 1850. Elizabeth was hesitant to publish the extremely personal collection, but Robert, a famous poet himself, urged her to publish them. The title suggesting that the sonnets were written by an unknown Portuguese was an attempt to give the couple some privacy.

    If thou must love me, let it be for nought
    Except for love's sake only. Do not say
    I love her for her smile ... her look ... her way
    Of speaking gently, ... for a trick of thought
    That falls in well with mine, and certes brought
    A sense of pleasant ease on such a day'—
    For these things in themselves, Beloved, may
    Be changed, or change for thee,—and love, so wrought,
    May be unwrought so. Neither love me for
    Thine own dear pity's wiping my cheeks dry,—
    A creature might forget to weep, who bore
    Thy comfort long, and lose thy love thereby!
    But love me for love's sake, that evermore
    Thou may'st love on, through love's eternity.

    Go To Complete Poem

    • Stories 0
    • Shares 1592
    • Favorited 27
    • Votes 213
    • Rating 4.09
    • Poem of the Day
    Featured Shared Story

    No Stories yet, You can be the first!

    Touched by the poem? Share your story! (0)

  7. 25. A Valentine

    Famous Poem

    This Valentine Poem from Edgar Allan Poe was originally titled "To Her Whose Name Is Written Below." The poem was for Frances Sargent Osgood and her name is within the poem.
    To find the name, take the first letter of the first line, the second letter of the second line, the third letter of the third line, and so on until the end.

        For her this rhyme is penned, whose luminous eyes,
             Brightly expressive as the twins of Loeda,
         Shall find her own sweet name, that, nestling lies
             Upon the page, enwrapped from every reader.
         Search narrowly the lines!—they hold a treasure
             Divine—a talisman—an amulet
         That must be worn at heart. Search well the measure—
             The words—the syllables! Do not forget
         The trivialest point, or you may lose your labor!
             And yet there is in this no Gordian knot

         Which one might not undo without a sabre,
             If one could merely comprehend the plot.
         Enwritten upon the leaf where now are peering
             Eyes scintillating soul, there lie perdus
         Three eloquent words oft uttered in the hearing
             Of poets, by poets—as the name is a poet’s, too.
         Its letters, although naturally lying
             Like the knight Pinto—Mendez Ferdinando—
         Still form a synonym for Truth—Cease trying!
             You will not read the riddle, though you do the best you can do.

    Go To Complete Poem

    • Stories 0
    • Shares 945
    • Favorited 12
    • Votes 291
    • Rating 4.07
    • Poem of the Day
    Featured Shared Story

    No Stories yet, You can be the first!

    Touched by the poem? Share your story! (0)

  8. 26. My Mistress' Eyes Are Nothing Like The Sun

    Famous Poem

    Poem about an ordinary relationship between lovers that is extraordinary. This poem is written in the form of a sonnet, which is a 14 line rhyming poem that has its origins in Italy. This poem makes fun of passionate love poetry in which the poet imagines that their lover is more spectacular than anything in the universe. Instead, the poet maintains that his relationship with his lover is as unique and magnificent as any other although his lover is an ordinary woman.

    My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
    Coral is far more red than her lips' red;
    If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
    If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
    I have seen roses damasked, red and white,
    But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
    And in some perfumes is there more delight
    Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
    I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
    That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
    I grant I never saw a goddess go;
    My mistress when she walks treads on the ground.
    And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
    As any she belied with false compare.

    Go To Complete Poem

    • Stories 1
    • Shares 1966
    • Favorited 12
    • Votes 270
    • Rating 4.04
    • Poem of the Day
    Featured Shared Story

    How absolutely lovely! The way the poem 'shows' more than tells is magnificent; this is an art unto itself!

    Touched by the poem? Share your story! (1)

  9. 27. Love Song For Lucinda

    Famous Poem

    The poem explores love through vivid imagery and cautionary advice. Love is likened to a ripe plum growing on a purple tree, enticing and enchanting those who taste it. Similarly, love is compared to a bright star in the Southern skies, captivating but potentially overwhelming if looked at too intently. Finally, love is likened to a high mountain in a windy sky, suggesting that while love can offer exhilarating highs, it's important not to push oneself too far or risk losing one's balance. Through these metaphors, Hughes offers insights into the complexities and dangers of love, urging readers to approach it with caution and moderation.

    Love
    Is a ripe plum
    Growing on a purple tree.
    Taste it once
    And the spell of its enchantment
    Will never let you be.

    Love
    Is a bright star
    Glowing in far Southern skies.
    Look too hard
    And its burning flame
    Will always hurt your eyes.

    Love
    Is a high mountain
    Stark in a windy sky.
    If you
    Would never lose your breath
    Do not climb too high.

    Go To Complete Poem

    • Stories 0
    • Shares 78
    • Favorited 1
    • Votes 8
    • Rating 4.00
    Featured Shared Story

    No Stories yet, You can be the first!

    Touched by the poem? Share your story! (0)

  10. 28. I, Being Born A Woman And Distressed

    Famous Poem

    "I, Being Born A Woman And Distressed" by Edna St. Vincent Millay also known as Sonnet XLI, is a poem that explores the complexities of love and desire. Through the use of poetic techniques such as imagery and metaphor, Millay portrays the speaker's struggle with societal expectations and her own desires. The poem's emotional tone is conflicted, with the speaker torn between her physical attraction to the addressee and her own sense of self. Edna St. Vincent Millay was an American poet and playwright known for her lyrical and emotionally charged poetry. She was a prominent figure in the literary and feminist movements of the early 20th century.

    I, being born a woman and distressed
    By all the needs and notions of my kind,
    Am urged by your propinquity to find
    Your person fair, and feel a certain zest
    To bear your body's weight upon my breast:
    So subtly is the fume of life designed,
    To clarify the pulse and cloud the mind,
    And leave me once again undone, possessed.
    Think not for this, however, the poor treason
    Of my stout blood against my staggering brain,
    I shall remember you with love, or season
    My scorn with pity, —let me make it plain:
    I find this frenzy insufficient reason
    For conversation when we meet again.

    Go To Complete Poem

    • Stories 0
    • Shares 61
    • Favorited 3
    • Votes 14
    • Rating 3.93
    Featured Shared Story

    No Stories yet, You can be the first!

    Touched by the poem? Share your story! (0)

  11. 29. Carnal Apple, Woman Filled, Burning Moon

    Famous Poem

    Pablo Neruda was a Chilean poet who lived from 1904-1973. He mostly wrote of politics and love. In this poem, he focuses on the latter. He writes of a passionate encounter with a woman he loves. He uses descriptive words and shares that love between two people has great moments but can also be filled with heartache. The sexual nature of his poems has caused controversy.

    Carnal apple, Woman filled, burning moon,
    dark smell of seaweed, crush of mud and light,
    what secret knowledge is clasped between your pillars?
    What primal night does Man touch with his senses?
    Ay, Love is a journey through waters and stars,
    through suffocating air, sharp tempests of grain:
    Love is a war of lightning,
    and two bodies ruined by a single sweetness.
    Kiss by kiss I cover your tiny infinity,
    your margins, your rivers, your diminutive villages,
    and a genital fire, transformed by delight,
    slips through the narrow channels of blood
    to precipitate a nocturnal carnation,
    to be, and be nothing but light in the dark

    Go To Complete Poem

    • Stories 0
    • Shares 943
    • Favorited 14
    • Votes 190
    • Rating 3.88
    • Poem of the Day
    Featured Shared Story

    No Stories yet, You can be the first!

    Touched by the poem? Share your story! (0)

  12. 30. Sylvia

    Famous Poem

    Sir George Etherege, from England, lived from 1635-1692. His main focus was writing plays, many of which were comedies. "Sylvia" is written about the subject of a beautiful woman who makes people believe in love, but the narrator will not allow others to love her, for she is his.

    The Nymph that undoes me, is fair and unkind;
    No less than a wonder by Nature designed.
    She's the grief of my heart, the joy of my eye;
    And the cause of a flame that never can die!

    Her mouth, from whence wit still obligingly flows,
    Has the beautiful blush, and the smell, of the rose.
    Love and Destiny both attend on her will;
    She wounds with a look; with a frown, she can kill!

    The desperate Lover can hope no redress;
    Where Beauty and Rigour are both in excess!
    In Sylvia they meet; so unhappy am I!
    Who sees her, must love; and who loves her, must die!

    Go To Complete Poem

    • Stories 1
    • Shares 783
    • Favorited 11
    • Votes 225
    • Rating 4.13
    Featured Shared Story

    This poem touched my heart so deeply I can't even explain. It has left me at a loss for words. There is no greater poem than one that will touch you so deeply that it leaves you speechless....

    Read complete story

    Touched by the poem? Share your story! (1)

21 - 30 of 30 Poems

Back to Top