Famous Love Poems - Page 2

21 - 25 of 25 Poems

  1. 21. If Thou Must Love Me

    Famous Poem

    If Thou Must Love Me is Sonnet 14 in "Sonnets from the Portuguese," a collection of 44 love poems from Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806 – 1861) to her future husband Robert Browning. The couple married in 1846 and the collection was first published in 1850. Elizabeth was hesitant to publish the extremely personal collection, but Robert, a famous poet himself, urged her to publish them. The title suggesting that the sonnets were written by an unknown Portuguese was an attempt to give the couple some privacy.

    If thou must love me, let it be for nought
    Except for love's sake only. Do not say
    I love her for her smile ... her look ... her way
    Of speaking gently, ... for a trick of thought
    That falls in well with mine, and certes brought
    A sense of pleasant ease on such a day'—
    For these things in themselves, Beloved, may
    Be changed, or change for thee,—and love, so wrought,
    May be unwrought so. Neither love me for
    Thine own dear pity's wiping my cheeks dry,—
    A creature might forget to weep, who bore
    Thy comfort long, and lose thy love thereby!
    But love me for love's sake, that evermore
    Thou may'st love on, through love's eternity.

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  3. 22. A Valentine

    Famous Poem

    This Valentine Poem from Edgar Allan Poe was originally titled "To Her Whose Name Is Written Below." The poem was for Frances Sargent Osgood and her name is within the poem.
    To find the name, take the first letter of the first line, the second letter of the second line, the third letter of the third line, and so on until the end.

        For her this rhyme is penned, whose luminous eyes,
             Brightly expressive as the twins of Loeda,
         Shall find her own sweet name, that, nestling lies
             Upon the page, enwrapped from every reader.
         Search narrowly the lines!—they hold a treasure
             Divine—a talisman—an amulet
         That must be worn at heart. Search well the measure—
             The words—the syllables! Do not forget
         The trivialest point, or you may lose your labor!
             And yet there is in this no Gordian knot

         Which one might not undo without a sabre,
             If one could merely comprehend the plot.
         Enwritten upon the leaf where now are peering
             Eyes scintillating soul, there lie perdus
         Three eloquent words oft uttered in the hearing
             Of poets, by poets—as the name is a poet’s, too.
         Its letters, although naturally lying
             Like the knight Pinto—Mendez Ferdinando—
         Still form a synonym for Truth—Cease trying!
             You will not read the riddle, though you do the best you can do.

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  5. 23. My Mistress' Eyes Are Nothing Like The Sun

    Famous Poem

    Poem about an ordinary relationship between lovers that is extraordinary. This poem is written in the form of a sonnet, which is a 14 line rhyming poem that has its origins in Italy. This poem makes fun of passionate love poetry in which the poet imagines that their lover is more spectacular than anything in the universe. Instead, the poet maintains that his relationship with his lover is as unique and magnificent as any other although his lover is an ordinary woman.

    My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
    Coral is far more red than her lips' red;
    If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
    If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
    I have seen roses damasked, red and white,
    But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
    And in some perfumes is there more delight
    Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
    I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
    That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
    I grant I never saw a goddess go;
    My mistress when she walks treads on the ground.
    And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
    As any she belied with false compare.

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    How absolutely lovely! The way the poem 'shows' more than tells is magnificent; this is an art unto itself!

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  6. 24. Carnal Apple, Woman Filled, Burning Moon

    Famous Poem

    Pablo Neruda was a Chilean poet who lived from 1904-1973. He mostly wrote of politics and love. In this poem, he focuses on the latter. He writes of a passionate encounter with a woman he loves. He uses descriptive words and shares that love between two people has great moments but can also be filled with heartache. The sexual nature of his poems has caused controversy.

    Carnal apple, Woman filled, burning moon,
    dark smell of seaweed, crush of mud and light,
    what secret knowledge is clasped between your pillars?
    What primal night does Man touch with his senses?
    Ay, Love is a journey through waters and stars,
    through suffocating air, sharp tempests of grain:
    Love is a war of lightning,
    and two bodies ruined by a single sweetness.
    Kiss by kiss I cover your tiny infinity,
    your margins, your rivers, your diminutive villages,
    and a genital fire, transformed by delight,
    slips through the narrow channels of blood
    to precipitate a nocturnal carnation,
    to be, and be nothing but light in the dark

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  7. 25. Sylvia

    Famous Poem

    Sir George Etherege, from England, lived from 1635-1692. His main focus was writing plays, many of which were comedies. "Sylvia" is written about the subject of a beautiful woman who makes people believe in love, but the narrator will not allow others to love her, for she is his.

    The Nymph that undoes me, is fair and unkind;
    No less than a wonder by Nature designed.
    She's the grief of my heart, the joy of my eye;
    And the cause of a flame that never can die!

    Her mouth, from whence wit still obligingly flows,
    Has the beautiful blush, and the smell, of the rose.
    Love and Destiny both attend on her will;
    She wounds with a look; with a frown, she can kill!

    The desperate Lover can hope no redress;
    Where Beauty and Rigour are both in excess!
    In Sylvia they meet; so unhappy am I!
    Who sees her, must love; and who loves her, must die!

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    This poem touched my heart so deeply I can't even explain. It has left me at a loss for words. There is no greater poem than one that will touch you so deeply that it leaves you speechless....

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