Famous Nature Poem

This deceptively simple poem is by Robert Frost (1874 – 1963). He wrote it in 1922 in a few moments after being up the entire night writing a long and complicated poem. The poem uses an AABA rhyme scheme. The repetition of the last line emphasizes the profundity contained in the last stanza, a popular reading for funerals.

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Anyone familiar with a wooded snowy vista would certainly be reminded of this poem as I did after being introduced to the writings many years ago in school. Many years have passed since its...

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Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening

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Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound’s the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.

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Has this poem touched you? Share your story!
  • by JAMES BROOKS
  • 1 year ago

Robert Frost is profound. Every sentence paints a picture. Every word is a world unto itself. In another poem he beckons, "You come too." His poems are personal and intimate. He speaks to us directly, making us feel we are worthy of his insights, his point of view.

  • by Deborah McArthur
  • 1 year ago

Anyone familiar with a wooded snowy vista would certainly be reminded of this poem as I did after being introduced to the writings many years ago in school. Many years have passed since its introduction. Nevertheless, time would have it that I experienced time after time a snowy wooded area in daily walks.

Though I am not familiar with horses, I have a dog who wears a collection of small bells around her collar. Bells, whether church bells or school bells, cause a bevy of remembrances. The poem is beautiful. It not only paints an imaginary picture in your mind of the scene, but it also alerts the sense of hearing at the mention of bells.

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